Exhaustion

litoren

imageh002.gif
SOUTHERN OSTROBOTHNIA

Seppo Mononen Exhaustion                      

Apr. 6.2009/sm

Contact: seppomononen@litorina.org

 seppomononen@hotmail.com

All Rights Reserved © Author Seppo Mononen

ISBN 978-952-5543-36-0 HTML

ISBN 978-952-5543-37-7 PDF

Buenos Aires 2009            

 

"Noli turbare circulos mios!" (lat.)

 

Seppo Mononen

Exhaustion

Exhaustion of a Population Sample as Indicated by Energy Level Variation in a Three Year Cycle.

 

1. Abstract
Human depression is a condition that is believed to result from life energy depletion to the extent that normal everyday functions are affected.
     Approaching death, the life energy resources are exhausted and energy settles at 0-level. With 0-energy death, therefore, is taken to present the ultimate exhaustion of human life. Mortality figures of a population consequently present a quantitative measure of exhaustion.
The mortality rate of a sample Finnish-speaking population residing in the South Ostrobothian Province (Etelä-Pohjanmaa) of Finland was studied. Another sample of the Swedish-speaking population of the Gulf of Bothian coastal region in Finland was selected as a reference.
     A total of 3010 deaths were surveyed, of which 1649 constituted the subject sample and 1361 the reference.Mortality anomalies quantitatively established terminal exhaustion, including suspect suicide-related incidents amongst the subject population. By comparison, the reference population showed no unexplainable anomalies and appeared normal in this respect.
     Compared to the reference, the sample females’ mortality as a child of less than 10 years of age was 4.14 -fold. Equally, 4.14 times more females died as adolescent of 10<20 years. The ratio of percentile death figures indicated that 6.19 times more males and females of the sample population died as adolescents of 10<20 years of age compared to the reference.  Furthermore, as adolescents of 10<20 years died 8.22 times more males of the sample compared to the males of the reference. Yet another anomaly appeared in the age group of 40<50 years, where the female deaths of the sample population numbered 2.49 times those of the reference.
     Based on the principle that death is the ultimate exhaustion, mortality figures were reduced to relative energy. This revealed a remarkable energy surge of the Finnish-speaking female population.  

2. Summary
Life energy approaches and finally reaches zero level upon death. It is therefore believed justified to establish death as an ultimate exhaustion and depression. Based on the mortality statistics the exhaustion of the sample Finnish-speaking population was proved numerically, and the three-year frequency was established.  The idea of a three year energy cycle was born from pieces of information. It became apparent from the biographies of artists and it was sustained by the characteristic features of the mortality statistics of the Finnish-speaking sample population. Regular distribution would dictate that every consequent year would have 33.33 % dead during the three year cycle (100%/3 yrs.).
     This study proved that this was not the case. In the10<20 year age category, compared to the Swedish-speaking reference, eightfold number of Finnish-speaking adolescents died. 4.17 times more feminines in the age group of 0<10 years, and 4.00 times more in the 10<20 years age group Finns died. In the female age group 40<50 years of age  2.5 times more Finnish-speaking deaths than their Swedish-speaking co-nationals.
     Mortality statistics by the season showed that spring was the top season of female deaths of the Finnish-speaking sample although the Swedish-speaking females were slightly above normal, as well.To pinpoint possible variation, the three year cycle was subdivided into quarter years, and mortality reduced into relative energy. This time frame served as basis for quarter year energy variations. The annual statistics indicated that periods of exhaustion occurred at three years interval. This investigation demonstrated an anomalous energy surge of the Finnish-speaking female population.   Remarkable new information on mortality of juveniles less than 30 years of age was obtained by processing the juvenile life span with a two-year screening.

 
3. Introduction

It was the conclusion of my earlier study (1984*) from comparing the human environment experienced in the Americas to that of my native people, that the lives of the Finns are perhaps cursed by sisu. Sisu is a myth I defined in general terms as defiance of reality. Or, actively renouncing the human reality as the clergy and religious people generally may do.
     The Finnish Medical Journal (Suomen Lääkärilehti, with English Resume) 28/1997 carried an interesting article. Based on the compensation statistics of the insurer, Folk Pension Plan of Finland, it was shown that in a mixed population coastal region the Swedish-speaking citizens fared better than the Finnish-speaking ones. They were found feeling healthier, lived older, and participated longer in the productive working life. The difference was attributed to what the researchers called social capital.
     The obituaries published by certain language-oriented newspapers covering the year 1999 were collected, and the dates of births and deaths were recorded. The obituaries published by the Ilkka at Seinäjoki constituted the subject sample (1), its readership representing the exclusively Finnish-speaking population of the South Ostrobothian Province (Etelä-Pohjanmaa). The data of the reference (2), representing the deaths of the Swedish-speaking population of the Bothnian Coastal Region (Pohjanmaan Rannikkoseutu) were collected from the following newspapers with Swedish speaking readership: Jakobstads Tidning, published at Pietarsaari, Vasabladet, Vaasa, and Syd-Österbotten, Närpiö
        
       
 Data Source   Sub TotalTOTAL
Sample 1Ilkka, Seinäjoki    1649
Reference (2)Vasabladet, Vasa   728 
 Syd-Österbotten, Närpes   256 
 Jakobstads Tidning, Jakobstad  3771361
Total sample     3010
         Table1. Data sources
 
A total of 3010 obituaries were qualified for testing as presented in the source in Table 1.
 
The subject population data consisted of a total of 1649 obituaries of which 820 were males and 829 females. Out of the 1361 Swedish-speaking reference, 676 were males and 685 females Working in different regions of Canada and the United States of America, and a couple years in South America, as well, it could happen that years passed for me without seeing a single countryman. Instead, the geography of the Americas became familiar as well as personality features of the peoples in general terms. 
     
It was against this background that I came to visit my old country.  I observed with curiosity that the people and the way they conducted their lives differed in a peculiar way from the peoples amongst whom I had lived and worked. I felt an urge to find out what was it all about: People appeared humans from the outside, but their entire manner and essence, speech and behavior looked like all learned by heart, robot like artificial pretense, perhaps.
     After a year of devotion, the conclusion was reached: sisu, a personality treat that makes the Finns themselves superior, means nothing else but defiance and denial of humanity and the reality altogether. It is sisu that prevents a Finn to be him or her; personality development may be hampered and foiled. Dualism governs the life in general; body and soul are separated from one another. In other words imagined theory does not need practical reality, soul a body. People living the sisu-myth must be good, but generally they think themselves as being better than others - if not the best of all in everything. This is a myth that in reality proves false illusion time after time, but nevertheless it is fomented and kept alive jealously. It is in the nature of the sisu-myth, that even though clear shortcomings of the society are revealed, it is not acceptable to discuss them publicly.    
      In the Governmental bodies there is a growing number of neo-nationalists, who in a dualistic way in ceremonies, newspaper articles, television programs etcetera maintain mythical overenthusiastic dispute and faith of the excellence of the Finnish society. This report describes an attempt to determine the Finishness in quantitative measures.The melancholic nature of a population was enlightened by the means of statistically recording mortality as a function of time. A record of seasonal deaths exhibited deviations from the arithmetic normal in the spring, such as mortality rate of the Finnish-speaking females 5.68 % above normal. 
     One of the principal objectives of this investigation was to numerically prove the proposed three year energy cycle: This study demonstrated that exhaustion/depression period could reoccur every three years.

4. Reference


The Finns are obsessed by sisu, was the conclusion of my 1984 study. Even though the solution satisfied at that time, one problem remained: My reference material was scattered all over the Americas and not available as far I desired to prove my intuitive theory. The matter was left there for years until available reference material appeared near.

    The Finnish Journal of Medicin (Suomen Lääkärilehti) published in its issue 28/1997 an article by Researcher Professor Markku T. Hyyppä et.al. concerning the compensations paid out in a certain region. Based on the statistics the compensations paid by the Folk Pension Plan to the Finnish-speaking and the Swedish-speaking populations of the same region were compared.  It was shown that in a bilingual region the Swedish-speaking population is healthier, lives longer, and fares better in every aspect of life than the Finish-speaking population.  It thus brought about remarkable savings in the social costs to the nation's economy. The difference was attributed to “social capital” which the Swedish-speaking population appeared to have.

    Birth and death, the beginning and end points of human reality are two genuine events of life when nobody can be expected to pretend. The time between these points is an objectively measurable length of life. Of the two groups the Finnish-speaking one responded to my previous subject sample and the Swedish-speaking population of the Bothnian Coastal Region appeared suitable reference.


5. Life Span

     In this chapter obituaries are considered with a ten-year screening: less than 10 years old, 10<20 years, 20<40 …100<110.Note: Here for example notation 10<20 means 10.00 and more years but less than 20.00 years old. Tables 6.4 show number of dead in ten year samples and respective percentages, males of males, females of females and sample out of sample for each Sample 1 and the Reference (2).

Table 4.1n Sample 1Percentage
Age yrs.nMalesnFemales nTotalMales 1Females 1Sample 1
under 10 410140,491,210,85
10<20105151,220,600,91
20<3094131,100,480,79
30<40149231,711,091,39
40<503921604,752,543,64
50<6071371088,654,476,55
60<701297220115,718,7012,19
70<8027021748732,8926,2129,53
80<9023734157828,8741,1835,05
90<100371121494,5113,539,04
100 & over0110,000,120,06
Total8218281649100,0100,0100,0
 
Table 4.2Reference (2)Percentage
Age yrs.nMalesnFemalesnTot.Males 2Females 2Sample 2
under 10 4260,590,290,44
10<201120,150,150,15
20<303250,450,290,37
30<40124161,780,581,18
40<50217283,121,022,06
50<603929685,794,225,00
60<70835013312,317,289,77
70<8022416538933,2324,0228,58
80<9024531556036,3545,8541,15
90<100421091516,2315,8711,09
100 & over0330,000,440,22
Total6746871361100,0100,0100,0
       
       

Table 4.1. Mortality of males and females by age: Sample 1 The Finnish-speaking population of the South Ostrobothnian Province (above);

Table 4.2. Reference sample 2, The dominantly Swedish-speaking population of the Bothnian coastal region.

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004

Figure 4.1. Life span: the Finnish-speaking population of the South-Ostrobothian Province, Sample 1 (note: for example age bracket 10<20 means 10 and more but less than 20 years). Occurrence in percent.

         Of the sampled Finnish-speaking population, 0.49 % of the males (4 incidents) and 1.22 % of the females (10 incidents) died as child under 10 years of age. As adolescents of 10<20 years died 1.22 % of the males (10) and 0.60 % of the females (5). As young adults 20<30 years died 1.10 % of males (9) and 0.48 % of females (4). At the 30<40 years age category died 1.71 % of the males (14) and 1.09 % of the females (9).

 Percentage dead shows a separation between sexes at about 40<50 years and on to the favour of the females. The majority 41.1 % of the females (341) died at the 80<90 years category whereas the most male deaths, 32.9 % (270) occurred at the maximum of their curve 70<80 years; and 28.9 % (237) at the 80<90 -year category.

One female, that is 0.12 % of the females, lived to over 100 years, but none of the males.

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6

 Figure 4.1.1. Mortality figures ratio Males: Females of Sample 1

Proportional death figures of the Sample 1 indicate that females died as child of less than 10 years of age at a rate of 2.5 times greater than that of the males (ratio 0.40). The ratio was the opposite at the adolescent category of 10<20 years, where the male rate was 2.02 times that of the females.

Little change was apparent in the 20<30 years adult category with the male deaths exceeding the female ones 2.27 times. The ratio was 1.57 at the 30<40 years category; 1.8 at 40<50; 1.94 at 50<60. Further, it was 1.88 at the 60<70 -year category, and 1.26 at 70<80. From here, concerning the higher age categories, the ratio fell below 1 being 0.70 (1.4x) at 80<90, and 0.33 (3.3x) at the age category of 90<100.

imageh008.gif
8

Figure 4.2. Life span: Reference sample 2, Swedish-speaking population of the Bothnian coastal region males, female. Occurrences in percent. 

         As can be seen from the percentile figures of the Swedish speaking reference (Figure 4.2. above), the male deaths exceeded those of the females from birth to 80<90 –year age category. From this on the females surpassed the males.

The percentile figures show that 0.59 % of the males (4 incidents) and 0.29 % of the females (2 incidents) died as a child of less than 10 years of age. As adolescent of 10<20 years died 0.15 % of males (1) and, equally, 0.15 % of females (1). As young adults at the age of 20<30 years died 0.45 % of the males (3) and 0.29 % of the females (2).

At the age category of 30<40 died 1.78 % of the males (12) and 0.58 % of the females (4), and from here on the male deaths are 1.2 … 8.8 % higher than those of females up to and inclusive 70<80 years category. 33.2 % of males (224) died at the 70<80 years and the maximum was at 80<90 years category where 36.3 % of males (245) died. The female curve reaches its maximum at 80<90 -year category where a total of 45.8 % of females (315) died.

Three females lived to over 100 years, but all the males died younger.

In the figure 4.2. the Reference (2) curves separate at the ages of 30<40 years. The male curve lies 1.2 – 8.8 % higher to the ages of 70<80 years. The female curve has its maximum 45.85 % at the 80<90 year age group. 33.23 of the males died at the age group 70<80 years, but the maximum of 36.35 % died at 80<90 years of age.

imageh010.gif
10

    Figure 4.2.1. Mortality Ratio, Reference, Males 2 : Females 2.

The death ratio boys: girls of the Swedish-speaking children under 10 years of age appear high at 2.04. However, the 4 boys represent only 0.59 % of males and the 2 girls only 0.29 % of the female deaths of the reference. The mortality ratio of the 10<20 -year aged adolescent category was 1.02, with one incident of each sex. The ratio 1.53 of the 20<30 -year aged young adults category resulted from 3 and 2 respective incidents.

The ratio of the 30<40 -year adult category was 3.0 to the advantage of females with 12 male and 4 female deaths, constituting 1.78 % of the males and 0.58 % of the females of the reference.

At the 40<50 -year category died 3.12 % of the males (21) and 1.02 % of the females (7), and the resultant male : female ratio was 3.0. Above this age the ratios were: 1.37 for 50<60; 1.69 for 60<70. Further, it was 1.38 for the 70<80 years category, and turned negative

Males of the subject sample 1 generally died younger than those of the reference (2). Most males died in the age group 70<80 years while those of the reference (2) died older at age group 80<90.

imageh012.gif
12

Figure 4.3. Death by Age: Entire Sample, Males and Females.

Deaths of integral sampling classified according to the sexes are plotted in the figure 4.3. Compared with the separate curves of the sample and the reference discussed previously, the integral curves appear more flat. This feature would be attributed to the extremities compensating each other.

imageh014.gif
14

Figure 4.3.1. The mortality ratio of all sampled Males : Females

With the ratio of 0.68, fewer boys (0.54 % of males) than girls (0.79 % of females) died as children less than 10 years of age. From this category on, the ratio turns to the opposite, in favour of females, so that as adolescent of 10<20 year died 0.74 % of males and 0.40 % of females giving the mortality ratio of 1.85.

imageh016.gif
16

Figure 4.4. Mortality % by age males Sample1, Reference (2)

 

The mortality percentage is presented in figure 4.4 for the entire sampled Finnish speaking Sample1 as well as for the Swedish speaking reference 2. As a general observation, the mortality rate throughout to the maximum of the sample 1 is higher than respective categories of the reference 2. Upon reaching the maximum on each group at 80<90 years of age the ratio turns the opposite. 35.05 % of the sampled Finnish population and 41.15 % of the reference 2 died here. The maximum of the Finnish curve reaches this age category due to the longevity of the females; male deaths had the maximum at the 70<80 years category.

imageh018.gif
18

Figure 4.5.1 Mortality Ratio; Males 1 : Males 2.

A ratio anomaly of the male juveniles aged 10<20 years occurred between the subject Sample 1 and the Reference (2). The Finnish-speaking adolescents died at a rate of 8.22 times their Swedish-speaking countrymen.

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20

Figure 4.6. Mortality % by Age; Females 1, Females 2. 

 Remarkable differences of female mortality occurred in children's category of less than 10 years, and adolescent category 10<20 years; and, furthermore, in 40<50 years female category. Four times more Finnish speaking females died both as child and as adolescents than Swedish speaking females in respective reference categories. The mortality of the Finnish speaking females in the 40<50 -year category was 2.5-fold.

imagehi022.gif
22

Figure 4.6.1. Mortality Ratio; Females 1 : Females 2.

The mortality ratio curve of the Finnish speaking females less than 50 years of age straddles up and down, while the respective male curve was - with the exception of the anomaly at 020 years - approximately constant.

Content

6. Death and Season

Possible seasonal effects in mortality the time of death was recorded in a table of seasons of the year 1999. Since there are four seasons in a year one would expect that, if evenly distributed, 25 % of deaths occurred every season. This study demonstrated that this was not the case.

Of all 3010 individuals 25.78 % died in the winter, whilst the highest mortality occurred in the spring with 26.61 %. The lowest record occurred in the summer with 23.29 %. Also the mortality in the fall was below arithmetic average at 24.32 %.

24
imageh024.gif

Figure 6.1. Death and the seasons 1999 Finnish-speaking Sample 1

imageh026.gif
26

Figure 6.2. Death and the seasons, Reference (sample 2)

The Finish-speaking subject group had mortality figures above the arithmetic normal in the winter with 25.70 % of males and 25.24 % of females dead. In the spring there were only 23.87 % of males dead, but 30.68 % of females, the latter being the highest record of all seasons. The rest of the year the mortality figures were rather even, males 25.58 % for the summer and 24.54 % the autumn and females 22.22 % summer and 21.86 % in the fall.

The mortality figures by the season of the Swedish-speaking reference group 2 differed notably from those of the subject. In the winter 26.81 % of males and 25.52 % of females died, each above the average. The spring was a record season with 27.55 % of females dying although less than the record of the subject female peak. Of males died 24.00 % in the spring and 22.37 % in the summer. 22.74 % of females died in the summer. Autumn proved another high for males at 29.81 % died, whereas females died below normal at 24.20 % in the spring.

Content

7. Juvenile Deaths

Juvenile mortality with two-year screening shows interesting details:

age

n femals1

% femals1

n males1

% males1

n femals2

% femals2

n males2

% males2

0<2

4

0,48

2

0,24

2

0,29

4

0,59

2<4

0

0,00

1

0,12

0

0,00

0

0,00

4<6

0

0,00

1

0,12

0

0,00

0

0,00

6<8

2

0,24

0

0,00

0

0,00

0

0,00

8<10

0

0,00

0

0,00

0

0,00

0

0,00

10<12

3

0,36

0

0,00

0

0,00

0

0,00

12<14

0

0,00

0

0,00

0

0,00

0

0,00

14<16

0

0,00

0

0,00

0

0,00

0

0,00

16<18

1

0,12

1

0,12

1

0,15

1

0,15

18<20

1

0,12

5

0,61

0

0,00

0

0,00

20<22

1

0,12

2

0,24

0

0,00

0

0,00

22<24

2

0,24

3

0,37

1

0,15

0

0,00

24<26

1

0,12

3

0,37

0

0,00

0

0,00

26<28

0

0,00

0

0,00

1

0,15

2

0,30

28<30

0

0,00

3

0,37

0

0,00

1

0,15

total

15

1,81

21

2,56

5

0,73

8

1,19

 

Table 7.1. Mortality of less than thirty years of age with two-year screening

Less than 10 years of age figures appeared suspect in the original 10-year screening and a new one was carried out now with at two-year sampling.

The above table totals 15 females (1.81 %) and 21 males (2.56 %) dead of the Finnish-speaking Sample 1 dead at the age of less than 30 years. On the other hand the reference (2) figures have only five males (0.73 % of reference females) and eight (1.19 % of it males).

To visualize the statistics an illustration was drawn on both Sample 1 and the reference (2). These figures show a grim story of the faith of the Finnish-speaking children.

At the age group 0<2 years both the subject sample and the reference had six deaths: Sample 1 had four female and two male children. The reference had two female and four male children. These figures are not believed to bear much general significance.

imageh028.gif
28

Figure 7.2. Mortality of less than 30 years of age, Finnish-speaking Sample 1

Serious questions arise tfrom he deaths of the Finnish-speaking boys of 2<4 and 4<6 years of age. Further unexplicable appear the deaths of girls at the 6<8 and 10<12 years of age. In the statistics of the Reference no deaths occur at any of these ages which may give rise to suspicions of  violence.

The deaths at the adolescent age group 16<18 occurred at the same age in both groups, which may be more than an interesting coincidence in a general view. A number of 15 adolescent males at the age of 18<20 years is suspected high particularly because there were no incidents in the age group of the reference. Suicide is what comes to mind with this evidence.

Five young females died between the ages of 18 and 26, partly victims of suspected violence, It is noteworthy that the reference group only had scattered incidents, and the entire 2-30 years statistics only thee Swedish-speaking females died.

imageh030.gif
30

Figure 7.3. Mortality of less than 30 years of age, Swedish-speaking Reference (2)

 Content

 

8. Cycle Theory

Accidents that lead to death as reported by daily media seem to be tied to the victims age in an interesting way: a 15-year old boy on his moped hit a train on a railway crossing; another 15-year old killed a girl one year his junior; a student of 18 years of age jumped under an in pulling train at a station; a man of 33 was burned dead inside his own house; a 45-year old woman shot dead her daughter in a new years eve.

A Finnish motoring magazine (Moottori) regularly publishes reports of fatal traffic accidents. A closer examination reveals that in a major part the conductors’ ages were divisible by three.

In his play Hamlet Prince of Denmark, William Shakespeare has drawn a picture of perpetual old melancholy personality whose moods change rapidly from joy to gloom and from idea to another. His tragedy was written some 400 years ago and is said to draw on Historia Danica of the Nordic peoples for sources 1100-1200.

 A Finnish composer Jean Sibelius was born December 8th 1865. He may have absorbed a creative spark throughout his 91 years long life from the personality treats of his very own. It is interesting to note that his major works were published in the three-divisible years of age. This goes to show the powers of cyclic energy when appropriately applied – even though probably unconsciously.

9.Schematic.jpg

Figure 8.1. A schematic presentation of energy cycle λ (lambda). Neutral level depicts energy use which normally is recovered with a nights’ sleep. Excessive energy use is a phase of euphoria-like hyperactivity that may lead to a long term depletion known as exhaustion or depression. The energy cycle was shown to stretch three years.

Supposing that no cycle existed, arithmetically normal 1/3 (approximately 33.33 %) number of deaths would occur in any consequent year of the cycle. Glancing at the obituaries it was apparent that more than 1/3 of the Finnish-speaking sample population died in a three-divisible year of their lives. Tbis would be the low energy phase. The high energetic episode was followed by the low energy episode, whose logic was the need to recover. Tiredness, apathy, even depression and death may be characteristic of the low energy episode. Recovery appears possible only after overtaxed mental and/or physical energy storage is sufficiently restored with time.

Approaching death, of natural causes or other, the life’s energy decreases and, eventually, settles at zero level. Here is how deaths ties up with energy and death can justifiably be called the ultimate exhaustion or depression.

In life that is maintained within the limits of personal reality, a good night’s sleep woujld be enough to replenish the energies consumed during the day. Overly feelings and energy consumption however may lead to energy shortage in a long run. The gravity of the energy deficiency is proportional to the expended extra energy. The cyclic energy curve is thought to commence with a low energy episode which by some researchers is called birth trauma. Pedagogs and parents may recognize the problem episode of the four year old toddlers. The fourth age year is the first cycle year of the second cycle, and may correspond to the traumatic first year.

For the purposes of this study a three year cycle was established. There the first year was given a symbol “v” from the Finnish language word vuosi (year, annum). v” was determined as zero, or a three-divisible integer. Zero (0) year commences the cycle and includes time v0<(v+1). Consequent year 1 includes time from (v+1) to (<v+2), and then third year from (v+2) to (<v+3). Since 3 is a three-divisible integer the consequent cycle commences here.

An extract copy of the work book shows the life span break down to quarter years of the Cycle. 

Age

v<0,25

v<0,50

v<0,75

v<1,00

v<1,25

v<1,50

v<1,75

v<2,00

v<2,25

v<2,50

v<2,75

v<3,00

73,96

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

85,34

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

79,89

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

83,33

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

84,53

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

90,79

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

86,99

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

89,53

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

81,49

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-

1

1

1

-

1

-

2

-

1

1

1

    Figure 8.2. Life span division into quarter years of the Cycle.

Extract copy above of the workbook lists the ages in years calculated from the data in two decimals (left column), for example 73.96. The nearest three-divisible age is 72. The remainder 1.96 is located to the column (v+1.75) < (v+2.00) which is the 8th quarter.

To test the cycle theory relative percentages of deaths were calculated for each of the three years of the cycle. Since 100 % - all sampled – died, the arithmetic normal would dictate that each year of the cycle should have 1/3 of the dead (in decimals approximately 33.33 % or 8.33 % per quarter year). A greater percentage means more than normal dead, smaller percentage less than normal dead.  Out of the 1649 individuals of the Finnish-speaking sample 34.63 % (571) died during the year 0; 32.75 % (540) died during the year 1; and 32.63 % (538) died during the year 2.

 

The Swedish-speaking reference had a total of 1361 dead of which 32.70 % (445) died during the first 0 year; 34.09 % (464) died during the year 1; and 33.21 % (452) during the year 2. The Finnish-speaking Sample 1 had 36.18 % males dead during the year 0, more than normal, while the corresponding figure of females was below normal at 33.09 %. The year 1 had 34.35 % males and 31.16 (minimum) females dead. The last year 2 of the Cycle had the minimum at 29.48 % for males, while females had their maximum at 35.75 %.

 

The mortality figures of the Swedish-speaking reference (2) followed reasonably near the arithmetic normal for the entire three year cycle. 31.75 % of the males and 33.62 % of the females died during the year 0. During the year 1 there were 34.27 % male and 33.92 % females deaths. During the final year 2 of the cycle corresponding figures were 33.98 % and 32.46 %.

Mortality % during the years of the Cycle

Years of the Cycle

Females1

Males1

Females2

Males2

v0 < v+1,00   =year 0

33,09

36,18

33,62

31,75

v+1,00 < v+2,00  =year 1

31,16

34,35

33,92

34,27

v+2,00 < v+3,00   =year 2

35,75

29,48

32,46

33,98

           Figure 8.3. Mortality during the years of the Cycle

The minimum number dead of Sample 1 were 29.48 % (males 1/year2) and maximum 36.18 % (males 1/year 0). The reference had a minimum 31.75 % dead (males2/year 0) and maximum 34.27 % (males 2/ year 1). The summary figures of the entire sample were 3010 individuals 33.75 (1016) dead during year 0; 33.36 % (1004) dead during the year 1; and 32.89 % (990) died during the last year 2 of the cycle.

imageh034.gif
34

Figure 8.4. Mortality % during the three years of the Cycle, Sample 1

Mortality during the years of the cycle demonstrates, as expected, that the curves of each sex of the Sample 1 deviate considerably from the level of arithmetically normal level of 33.33 %. The greatest deviation of male mortality 36.18 % (+2.85 % more than normal) is in the first year of the cycle, and the lowest 29.48 % (-3.85 % less than normal) during the third year. The highest deviation of the female figures 35.75 % (+2.42 % more than normal) occurred during the third year.

The mortality curves of both males and females of the Reference (2) appear normally at a distance of 1 percent of the normal with the exception of the first year figure 31.75 %, or -1.58 % below normal.

imageh036.gif
36

Figure 8.5. Mortality % during the three years of the Cycle, Reference (2)

 

9. Energy Levels

Table below presents male and female numbers and percentages dead during the cycle, Sample 1 and the Reference (2).

Mortality variation during the Cycle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quarter years

nRy1

% Ryl1

nNa1

%Na1

nMi1

%Mi1

nRy2

%Ryl2

nNa2

%Na2

nMi2

%Mi2

1

‘v < (v+0,25)

152

9,22

75

9,06

77

9,38

120

8,82

63

9,17

57

8,46

2

(v+0,25) < (v+0,50)

153

9,28

73

8,82

80

9,74

100

7,35

48

6,99

52

7,72

3

(v+0,50) < (v+0,75)

135

8,19

76

9,18

59

7,19

119

8,74

62

9,02

57

8,46

4

(v+0,75) < (v+1,00)

131

7,94

50

6,04

81

9,87

106

7,79

58

8,44

48

7,12

 

 

 

 

0,00

 

0,00

 

0,00

 

0,00

 

0,00

 

0,00

5

(v+1,00) < (v+1,25)

124

7,52

55

6,64

69

8,40

119

8,74

60

8,73

59

8,75

6

(v+1,25) < (v+1,50)

129

7,82

60

7,25

69

8,40

125

9,18

70

10,19

55

8,16

7

(v+1,50) < (v+1,75)

152

9,22

78

9,42

74

9,01

101

7,42

51

7,42

50

7,42

8

(v+1,75) < (v+2,00)

135

8,19

65

7,85

70

8,53

119

8,74

52

7,57

67

9,94

9

(v+2,00) < (v+2,25)

135

8,19

68

8,21

67

8,16

92

6,76

47

6,84

45

6,68

10

(v+2,25) < (v+2,50)

141

8,55

78

9,42

63

7,67

115

8,45

62

9,02

53

7,86

11

(v+2,50) < (v+2,75)

120

7,28

68

8,21

52

6,33

131

9,63

61

8,88

70

10,39

12

(v+2,75) < (v+3,00)

142

8,61

82

9,90

60

7,31

114

8,38

53

7,71

61

9,05

 

 

 

 

100,00

 

100,00

 

100,00

 

100,00

 

100,00

 

100,00

 

 

Total n

1649

 

828

 

821

 

1361

 

687

 

674

 

 

 

% - percent

 

 

 

n - number

 

 

 

Ry -– Sample

 

 

 

Na - females

 

 

 

Mi - males

 

Table 9.1. Mortality during the cycle

imageh038.gif
38

Figure 9.2. Mortality % during quarter years of the Cycle, Sample 1

The mortality curve of the Sample 1 Finnish-speaking females appears uneven. The curve demonstrates a of three quarter- year period where females died at a rate 2.29 % below the arithmetic normal (8.33)in the fourth; 1.69 % below normal in the fifth; and still 1.08 % below normal in the fourth quarter. The male mortality curve descents from near normal 8.16 in the ninth quarter to 6.33 (2.00 % less than normal) in the eleventh quarter of the cycle.

imageh040.gif
40

Figure 9.3. Relative energy level, Sample1

The relative energy curves of the Finnish-speaking females demonstrate a long episode of high energy surge. The quarters 1, 2, and 3 appear with a moderate shortage of energy but in the beginning of the surge the energy level rapidly rose from -3.3 in the third quarter to +9.18 of the next quarter.  Certain imbalance is anticipated at this point of the episode. Males experienced a shorter episode of high energy in the eleventh quarter reaching a level of +7.98 e

imageh042.gif
42

Figure 9.4. Mortality % during the quarter years of the Cycle, Reference 2

The mortality curves of the Swedish-speaking reference (2) straddle about the arithmetic arithmetic normal mortality line of 8.33 %. 10.19 % of females died in the sixth quarter (1.64 % above normal). Of males 10.39 % died in the eleventh quarter (1.95 % above normal).On the negative energy shortage side the ninth quarter appears interesting, hence 6.84 % of females as well as 6.68 % of males died.

imageh046.gif
46

Figure 9.6. Relative male energy level, males Sample 1, males Reference (2)

The curves of relative energy level of the Swedish-speaking reference (2) differed from the subject sample in the way that they did not deviate much from the neutral arithmetic normal level. Females experienced a -7.43 energy deficiency in the sixth quarter. Males had a short low -8.21 energy episode in the eleventh quarter. 

image023.gif
h48

Figure 9.7. Relative female energy levels, Sample 1 and the Reference (2)

 

10. Conclusion

The current study confirmed earlier report by Hyyppä et.al. that the Finnish-speaking sample population generally lived shorter lives and that the females outlived males. New knowledge was obtained among other things regarding the nature of mortality of the Finnish-speaking sample population.

The remarkable differences included the 4.17-fold deaths of female children less than 10 years, and 10<20 age group females 4.00-fold mortality compared with their respective Swedish-speaking co-nationals. Further, 2.49 times more females of 40<50 years of age died. A distinctive difference was on the male mortality rate of the 10<20 age group where 8.13 times more adolescents died. Adjacent to this anomaly, a high mortality in the 20<30 year age group males with coefficient 2.44 compared to their Swedish-speaking co-patriots is outstanding.

It is the basic presumption that the social infrastructure with developed health care system covers homogenously the entire realm so that the reasons for the differences have to be looked elsewhere.

Aforementioned Hyyppä discusses about the social capital as a humanizing factor of the Swedish-speaking population, the treat which consistently would be scarce amongst the Finnish-speaking population sample. It is the shortage of social capital that ought to relate the very myth of Finishness, sisu. Sisu means defiance of reality which hampers or even prevents a normal personal development of the citizens. Ability to maintain normal everyday energy level is the key to prevent hyperactivity and consequently exhaustion and depression. Somewhat developed mental and, indeed, personal social skills may be needed to manage one’s daily energy consumption.

Hyperactivity leading to exhaustion appeared characteristic to the Finnish-speaking sample of the Province of South Ostrobothia (Etelä-Pohjanmaa). Particularly the female episode of high energy would refer to a long term hyperactivity during the quarter years four (+9.18), five (+6.76), and six (+4.34). The male high energy episode (+7.98) occurred at the 11th quarter year of the cycle and appeared of shorter duration.

The reference population of the Swedish-speaking population sample demonstrated no unexplainable anomalies of mortality or energy levels. It could be therefore considered normal in this respect. During the entire three year long energy cycle the energy levels were maintained at the vicinity of the normal 0-level.

________________

* )Seppo Mononen, Sisun hedelmät, 300 s, self v 1984

Seppo Mononen

Exhaustion

ISBN 978-952-5543-36-0 HTML

ISBN 978-952-5543-37-7 PDF

Buenos Aires 2009

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